The little band saw that could

I looked at a lot of metal-cutting band saws, but the cheap ones were junk and for such occasional use the not-so-cheap ones were hard to justify. I did have my late father’s old wood working band saw in the shed, and wondered whether it might be pressed into service. I was probably the last person to use this machine, 40+ years ago. It has precious few guards over the moving parts, and NO SWITCH – just turned on and off at the power point! In this day and age it’s hard to imagine letting a young pre-teenage boy use such a dangerous piece of equipment, unsupervised and alone, in a workshop – but back then things were different.

The old rubber power cord was perished beyond belief, and basically fell off. The old electric motor looked OK though, and after testing the insulation I wired up a new power cord, stood back, and turned it on. It worked! So I measured the length required, and ordered some 14 tpi blades from www.bandsawsupplies.com.au. Once these arrived I fitted one and made the usual adjustments to make it run true. The band saw cut through some sample pieces of Aluminium like butter. The only problem is, the Aluminium chips showered down all over the old electric motor, and also onto the rubber lining on the lower wheel. I’ll make a shield to keep the chips from falling through vents on the old motor, and just have to keep brushing them out of the old rubber wheel linings.

Engine patented in 1936, which makes me comfortable given that we all happily fly around using Lycoming aircraft engines

Engine patented in 1936, which makes me comfortable given that we all happily fly around using Lycoming aircraft engines

Modest guards on the front

Modest guards on the front

No guards on the back in those days!

No guards on the back in those days!

 

 

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